Midnight Pacific Time
The Other Side of Midnight
Hosted by Richard C. Hoagland
Tuesday Through Saturday
Midnight to 2 a.m.
Began Tuesday May 3, 2016
Broadcast Management Services, Inc. 2016

Tuesdays - Saturday Midnight - 2am
Chandra Wickramasinghe
THE OTHER SIDE OF MIDNIGHT
Midnight to 2 a.m.

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Chandra Wickramasinghe

Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe is an internationally acclaimed astronomer, famous for his pioneering studies on the carbonaceous nature of cosmic dust and the prevalence extraterrestrial life. He is a recipient of several international awards and honorary doctorates. He was a former Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge and a Professor at Cardiff University for 40 years. He is currently Honorary Professor and Director of the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology at the University of Buckingham, a Visiting Academics at Churchill College, Cambridge, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. He is also a founder member of the newly-formed Institute for the Study of Panspermia and Astroeconomics in Gifu, Japan. He has written over 30 books and 300 scientific papers, over 60 of these being in the journal Nature.

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Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe is an internationally acclaimed astronomer, famous for his pioneering studies on the carbonaceous nature of cosmic dust and the prevalence extraterrestrial life. He is a recipient of several international awards and honorary doctorates. He was a former Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge and a Professor at Cardiff University for 40 years. He is currently Honorary Professor and Director of the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology at the University of Buckingham, a Visiting Academics at Churchill College, Cambridge, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. He is also a founder member of the newlyformed Institute for the Study of Panspermia and Astroeconomics in Gifu, Japan. He has written over 30 books and 300 scientific papers, over 60 of these being in the journal Nature.
Chandra Wickramasinghe (born 20 January 1939) is a Sri Lankan-born British mathematician, astronomer and astrobiologist. His research interests include the interstellar medium, infrared astronomy, light scattering theory, applications of solid-state physics to astronomy, the early Solar System, comets, astrochemistry, the origin of life and astrobiology. A student and collaborator of Fred Hoyle, the pair worked jointly for over 40 years as influential proponents of panspermia. In 1974 they proposed the hypothesis that some dust in interstellar space was largely organic.
Hoyle and Wickramasinghe have advanced the argument that various outbreaks of illnesses on Earth are of extraterrestrial origins, including the 1918 flu pandemic and certain outbreaks of polio and mad cow disease. For the 1918 flu pandemic they hypothesized that cometary dust brought the virus to Earth simultaneously at multiple locations—a view almost universally dismissed by external experts on this pandemic. Claims connecting terrestrial disease and extraterrestrial pathogens have been rejected by the scientific community.
Wickramasinghe has written more than 30 books about astrophysics and related topics;[9] he has made appearances on radio, television and film, and he writes online blogs and articles. He has appeared on BBC Horizon, UK Channel 5 and the History Channel. He appeared on the 2013 Discovery Channel program "Red Rain". He has an association with Daisaku Ikeda, president of the Buddhist sect Soka Gakkai International, that led to the publication of a dialogue with him, first in Japanese and later in English, on the topic of Space and Eternal Life.
Chandra Wickramasinghe